Yukio Mishima and the poetry of death

Another Lost Shark

For me, 2010 is the year of all things ‘Ocean Hearted’. Work is now well underway on the multi-media project and the manuscript is nearing completion. So with my head full of the ocean, I have recently started re-reading the Mishima classic, The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With The Sea.

 

Set against the backdrop of post-WWII Japan, the book explores the intricate relationships of 13 year old Noboru, a boy convinced of his own genius; the widow Fusako, an importer of European finery; and Ryuji, a merchant seaman, who also believes his is destined for greatness; “a glittering special order kind no ordinary man would be permitted.” And all the while lurking in the background are the gang of schoolboys, Noburo has become deeply interwined with. Led by The Chief, the boys practise ‘absolute dispassion’ with devastating results.

Mishima’s writing is at all times sharp and uncompromising. He  intersperses flourishes of…

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One thought on “Yukio Mishima and the poetry of death

  1. […] Yukio Mishima and the poetry of death (seldenvosviii.wordpress.com) […]

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